1 Wood Street, EC2

Complete redevelopment of site. Headquarters of Eversheds, this mixed use development replaced a 1960s scheme. The Cheapside elevation is clad in Portland stone.

 

Project Details

Name

1 Wood Street, EC2

Department

Party Wall

Client

Land Securities

Architect

Fletcher Priest

Drapers Gardens

The Brief

To administer the client’s obligations under the Party Wall Act. Demolition of a 34 storey 1960′s office block – the tallest building to be demolished in the UK.

The Solution

The site was surrounded on three sides by adjoining buildings requiring consent under the act. The tower occupied the centre of the site with a two storey podium structure to all sides. The site was of significant archaeological interest and due to the time to demolish the tower, there was a need to free up the perimeter of the site so that the archaeologists could work on the site whilst the tower was being demolished. This meant that an intricate system of sheet piles and in some cases, ground anchors were required in order to provide an open working area with the need for any temporary supports restricting the site.

Together with the main piled foundations, and enclosing in upon the buildings to the site boundary, we served in excess of 120 Party Wall notices on adjoining owners and carried out schedules of condition on ten large buildings.

Simply managing the information dealing with so many different buildings presented a significant challenge not only for the design team but also for the adjoining owners’ surveyors and their advising engineers. New systems and procedures for managing this volume of information were introduced by GIA which contributed to timely delivery of agreements for the works to proceed.

 

Project Details

Name

Drapers Gardens, London

Department

Party Wall

Developer

Canary Wharf Contractors Limited

Architect

Foggo Associates

The Shard

3 The Shard.jpg

The Brief

To administer Party Wall matters and undertake neighbourly schedules of condition.

To carry out post construction condition survey prior to transferring each floor to leaseholders

The Solution

The complexities of constructing the foundations required for what is the tallest building in Europe were significant and had a wide impact on the potential for movement to adjoining buildings, some of which are critical transport infrastructure and Guys Hospital tower.

This necessitated the approval of all substructure construction details and methods along with requirement to monitor each of the adjoining buildings including the London Underground tunnels and Network Rail running tracks for London Bridge station.

In addition to this, we also carried out a schedule of condition of all buildings surrounding the site on 4 sides including Guys Hospital Tower and Ancillary Buildings, Arches beneath London Bridge Station, London Dungeon, London Bridge Station and tracks, Jubilee Line platforms and running tunnel, London Bridge station roof and office buildings. In total, we inspected in excess of 150,000 square meters of space having been surveyed and detailed by GIA’s team of surveyors who took in excess of 28,000 photographs.

 In December 2011, we were again commissioned to work in this iconic building, this time to undertake an as built condition survey of each floor prior to hand over to the incoming tenant for fit out

Project Details

Name

Shard of Glass, London

Department

Party Wall

Developer

Sellar Property Group

Architect

Renzo Piano Building Workshop

Cannon Street Station

The Brief

To administer the clients obligations under the Party Wall Act; to advise on other Neighbourly and Third Party Matters with respect to the interfaces with Network Rail, London Underground, Metronet and surrounding properties including livery companies. The key statistics of the project was the demolition of a 10-storey slab block and other associated buildings over the Cannon Street Station London Terminus; redevelopment of the site with a landmark building befitting the status of Hines UK as a Developer.

The Solution

The site was adjoined on two sides with buildings requiring consent under the Act and the opposite side of a narrow road from Livery companies’ offices.

The Network Rail & LUL services (District Line) had to be maintained without disruption throughout the demolition and redevelopment of the site. Due to the presence of an ancient Roman Emperors Palace beneath the station, the structure reuses the existing piles, introduces very few additional poles and yet hugely increases the available commercial floor space whilst lowering the overall height of the building and improving the viewing corridors to St Paul’s Cathedral.

This is done by raising the whole building so the station platforms are clearly visible from Cannon Street, bridging a span of some 40 metres between cores, cantilevering some 20 metres from the two cores over the LUL property on Cannon Street and towards the rear over the Network Rail station platforms.

Detailed development agreements with Network Rail and LUL including unusually advanced levels of construction detail needed to be in place before any work on site could commence.

There were a number of consent matters with one of the adjoining properties requiring intricate consideration of the impact of working within their own building and negotiating the terms of access rights.

Project Details

Name

Cannon Street Station, London

Department

Party Wall

Developer

Hines UK

Architect

Foggo Architects